princeowl:

the worst thing you can say to someone is ‘you’re too sensitive’ because that’s basically saying ‘you feel things more deeply and fully than i do and this inconveniences me because now i have to be more mindful of my own actions’ 

you’re not too sensitive, the world is just callous and stubborn. sensitivity doesn’t make you weak and callousness doesn’t make you strong. 

californiapants said: 

Just make sure not to use spray paint on the bat

can I ask why? because it’s made of foam? i was planning on sealing it first whatever i do

i-come-by-it-honestly:

John Scalzi gets it.

updates on punk sailor moon

going to paint the baseball bat - the props rules allows it as long as it’s tied to me - and hopefully will add more patches but i think that’s enough badges

blackwishingstar:

Teaching Consent to Small Children

afrafemme:

A friend and I were out with our kids when another family’s two-year-old came up. She began hugging my friend’s 18-month-old, following her around and smiling at her. My friend’s little girl looked like she wasn’t so sure she liked this, and at that moment the other little girl’s mom came up and got down on her little girl’s level to talk to her.

“Honey, can you listen to me for a moment? I’m glad you’ve found a new friend, but you need to make sure to look at her face to see if she likes it when you hug her. And if she doesn’t like it, you need to give her space. Okay?”

Two years old, and already her mother was teaching her about consent.

My daughter Sally likes to color on herself with markers. I tell her it’s her body, so it’s her choice. Sometimes she writes her name, sometimes she draws flowers or patterns. The other day I heard her talking to her brother, a marker in her hand.

“Bobby, do you mind if I color on your leg?”

Bobby smiled and moved himself closer to his sister. She began drawing a pattern on his leg with a marker while he watched, fascinated. Later, she began coloring on the sole of his foot. After each stoke, he pulled his foot back, laughing. I looked over to see what was causing the commotion, and Sally turned to me.

“He doesn’t mind if I do this,” she explained, “he is only moving his foot because it tickles. He thinks its funny.” And she was right. Already Bobby had extended his foot to her again, smiling as he did so.

What I find really fascinating about these two anecdotes is that they both deal with the consent of children not yet old enough to communicate verbally. In both stories, the older child must read the consent of the younger child through nonverbal cues. And even then, consent is not this ambiguous thing that is difficult to understand.

Teaching consent is ongoing, but it starts when children are very young. It involves both teaching children to pay attention to and respect others’ consent (or lack thereof) and teaching children that they should expect their own bodies and their own space to be respected—even by their parents and other relatives.

And if children of two or four can be expected to read the nonverbal cues and expressions of children not yet old enough to talk in order to assess whether there is consent, what excuse do full grown adults have?

Topic: DIVERSITY IN THE MARVEL UNIVERSE
Anthony Mackie: We’re in a day and age where kids deserve someone they can look up to. I’m very proud of Scarlett with what she’s been able to do with Black Widow, and how little girls can sit back and see that she doesn’t have to have superpowers, she’s just a badass. While being cool and a chick. And I like the fact that little brown kids can say, ‘hey, the Falcon is there now’, and little green kids can say, ‘the Hulk’s there’. Don’t want to leave out the Martians. I think it’s very important, and I think Marvel has been at the forefront of that, giving people the opportunity to represent every aspect of culture. It’s definitely something that was on the table, and on my mind when I decided to sign on to this project.
Topic: FANS COMPLAINING ABOUT CASTING ON GROUNDS OF RACE
Anthony Mackie: Superman, black would be the coolest dude in the world. Imagine Sam Jackson in a cape. Running around. That would be a good movie.
I think what a lot of people don’t get is, these people aren’t real. If you cast a black dude as John F Kennedy, that’s wrong. If you cast a white dude as Martin Luther King, that’s wrong. These people aren’t real. The suits aren’t real. There aren’t really superheroes in the world.
At some point in time, you have to steep yourself in reality and say, ‘hey, it’s not about what they look like, it’s about casting a good actor in the role. If you’re sitting at home and you can’t see a black guy as Nick Fury, maybe there’s something wrong with you.

thatkindoffangirl:

eternal-floette:

How long until the 15 year olds take over this post with their garbage

I’ve stopped being 15 years old long enough that I have the privilege of occasionally saying something that is not garbage so let’s try to pull it off.

What you are trying to express with this comic is problematic. The idea that tumblr or more specifically social justice activist don’t know that these people exist is not only false (they do), but feeds into a shallow narrative of what social justice is and how it should relate to the individual.

As the name implies, social justice is social, the opposite of individual. As an individual you are entitled to your opinion. You have no problem being called faggot? Your right. Want to try your bindi on your white friend that looks supercute in it? There is no social justice police going to stop you from that. But the moment in which you don’t recognize that no matter what your opinion is, and no matter what your feelings on these issues are these actions harm your group at a societal level, then you are wrong. Not as a matter of opinions anymore, but as a matter of facts.

Cultural appropriation (bindi/dreads), microaggressions (faggot/racial prejudice), lack of representation (transexuality awareness) and claims of “reverse sexism” are hurting minorities, no matter what anyone’s opinion on these issue is. Research out there shows that all the problems you are tackling here harm at a societal level the same people you have depicted here as not affected by them at an individual one. 

As an example, I have OCD, and I really do not care about people who say things like “oh I’m so OCD”. I understand that they mean no harm to me, I understand that their ignorance is not their fault, and I understand that is just a word. I don’t care about all this. BUT when this illness keeps being trivialized as a character quirk a lot of bad shit happens at a societal level: people getting told they should just get over it, people who fit the diagnosis not recognizing that they have it because OCD is wrongly represented, people being denied accommodations for their disability because OCD is not so bad and so on. Did this ever happen to me? No. It didn’t affect me as an individual (yet). But it does affect society, and it is my duty as a member of a larger group to take a step back, to realize that not everyone is going to be as lucky as I am, and realize that my individual thoughts and experiences do not matter when other people out there are suffering from the results of that harmless ignorance I could easily ignore based on my individual experience. And after I’ve done that I need to call out that ignorance, because the moment in which I justify that ignorance on the base that as an individual, I am not affected by it is the moment in which I become the oppressor of the same minority I belong in.

nightofthelivingdeadpoetssociety:

order a fucking pizza with me and watch a fucking shitty film with me and play with my fucking hair and wear my fucking tees to bed and fall asleep in my fucking arms you fucking fuck 

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